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Multilingualism

The law dated 12 August 2003, which established the creation of the University of Luxembourg, foresees in article 3 that “the running of the University is based on (…) the multilingual nature of its teaching”.

The University's languages are: French, English, and German.

Multilingualism is a key element in the strategic development of the UL as this can provide the University with a unique asset of being able to offer a bilingual diploma, which is a justifiable and undeniable niche opportunity based on the multilingual context enjoyed by the UL: Luxembourg is bordered by three other countries, right in the heart of Europe and accommodates many European institutions. Multilingualism appears to be an essential element that is indeed central to the international reputation of the UL.

It is becoming essential to place the students at the core of the process and to equip them with an additional asset with which to enter the labour market; something which adds value and can be directly transferred to their qualification. Competence in essential languages on the international market will give them knowledge, flexibility and an open-minded attitude which will distinguish them from candidates with monolingual qualifications.

Rules

  1. All degree courses must be bilingual and the secondary language should represent at least 25% of the course, except in cases where the language determines the content of the discipline.
  2. Masters: the majority of masters courses must be bilingual (the secondary language should represent at least 25% of the course) and a minimum of 20% will be in English, except in cases where the language determines the content of the course.
  3. Each of the three languages must at least be evident in 20% of the courses.
  4. To have students, academic staff engaged in teaching and research and administrative staff who are trilingual, if possible.
    • For students, competence in the languages required for the course is sufficient.
    • For academic staff engaged in teaching and research and administrative staff, most must be competent in at least two and ideally three of the languages used within the University (French, English, and German).
    • Administrative staff in direct contact with students must be competent in at least three and ideally four of the following languages: French, English, German, and Luxembourgish.

Contact: Michel Margue