University Choir

The Luxembourg University Choir is a blend of energetic voices sharing harmonies that inspire the Luxembourg community.

Led by Julia Pruy, a professional music director and coached by Tom Gareau a professional vocal trainer, the choir is blossoming into a group notable for its willingness to perform various arrangements, in a diverse set of musical genres. Along with smaller performances scattered throughout the year, they culminate each academic term (Christmas resp. Summer Concert) with a range of performances showcasing their complete selection of works (classical to contemporary).

The choir is also a place to broaden musical horizons, many as composers and conductors as well as singers, and provides a wonderful opportunity to meet other gifted musicians. The goal of the University Chorus is to provide our singers and our audiences with a stimulating musical experience

Membership in the Chorus is open to all musicians in the campus community: undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, staff, community members. Previous singing experience and / or some sight reading skills are recommended. Acceptance into the chorus is by audition! Please feel welcome and sing along with us!

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  • When: ... rehearsals on Tuesdays | 7:00-9:30pm | Re-starting September 17th
  • Where: Campus Kirchberg 

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NEW CHOIR PROJECT:

In collaboration with the Collegium Musicum of the 'Universität des Saarlandes and the Music Conservatory of Luxembourg.

The Armed Man is a Mass by Welsh composer Karl Jenkins, subtitled "A Mass for Peace". The piece was commissioned by the Royal Armories Museum for the Millennium celebrations, to mark the museum's move from London to Leeds, and it was dedicated to victims of the Kosovo crisis. Like Benjamin Britten's War Requiem before it, it is essentially an anti-war piece and is based on the Catholic Mass, which Jenkins combines with other sources, principally the 15th-century folk song "L'homme armé" in the first and last movements. It was written for SATB chorus with soloists (soprano and muezzin) and a symphonic orchestra. Guy Wilson, then master of the museum, selected the texts for the mass. [1] In addition to extracts from the Ordinary of the Mass, the text incorporates words from other religious and historical sources, including the Islamic call to prayer, the Bible (e.g. the Psalms and Revelation), and the Mahabharata. Writers whose words appear in the work include Rudyard Kipling, Alfred Lord Tennyson, and Sankichi Toge, who survived the Hiroshima bombing but died some years later of leukemia.

The Armed Man charts the growing menace of a descent into war, interspersed with moments of reflection; shows the horrors that war brings; and ends with the hope for peace in a new millennium, when "sorrow, pain and death can be overcome".[2] It begins with a representation of marching feet, overlaid later by the shrill tones of a piccolo impersonating the flutes of a military band with the 15th-century French words of "The Armed Man". After the reflective pause of the Call to Prayer and the Kyrie, "Save Us from Bloody Men" appeals for God's help against our enemies in words from the Book of Psalms. The Sanctus has a military, menacing air, followed by Kipling's "Hymn before Action". "Charge!" draws on words from John Dryden's "A song for St. Cecilia's day" (1687) and Jonathan Swift citing Horace (Odes 3,2,13), beginning with martial trumpets and song, but ending in the agonized screams of the dying. This is followed by the eerie silence of the battlefield after action, broken by a lone trumpet playing the Last Post. "Angry Flames" describes the appalling scenes after the bombing of Hiroshima, and "Torches" parallels this with an excerpt from the Mahabharata (book 1, chapter 228),[3] describing the terror and suffering of animals dying in the burning of the Khandava Forest. Agnus Dei is followed by "Now the Guns have Stopped", written by Guy Wilson himself as part of a Royal Armories display on the guilt felt by some returning survivors of World War I. After the Benedictus, "Better is Peace" ends the mass on a note of hope, drawing on the hard-won understanding of Lancelot and Guinevere that peace is better than war, on Tennyson's poem "Ring Out, Wild Bells" and on the text from Revelation (21,4): "God shall wipe away all tears".

Source: Wikipedia

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UL Choir goes ... facebook

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Video:

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Audio: 

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‘Music is the divine way to tell beautiful, poetic things to the heart.’

Pablo Casals

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For further information

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