Sarah Degano

Sarah Degano

Doctoral researcher

Faculty or Centre Faculté des Lettres, des Sciences Humaines, des Arts et des Sciences de l'Education
Research Unit ECCS
Postal Address Université du Luxembourg
Maison des Sciences Humaines
11, Porte des Sciences
L-4366 Esch-sur-Alzette
Campus Office MSH, E03 25-090
Email
Telephone (+352) 46 66 44 9221
Fax (+352) 46 66 44 39221

Sarah Degano joined the Research Unit Education, Culture, Cognition and Society as a PhD student in January 2017. Her current research interests include multilingualism, education and language learning. Sarah’s doctoral project is part of the CALIDIE research project and explores the extent to which children draw on their language repertoires to learn in primary schools in multilingual Luxembourg. Her project is supervised by Ass.-Prof. Dr. Claudine Kirsch. Sarah took her MA degree in Educational Sciences at the “Université Libre de Bruxelles”. In her study, she focused on the representations of different educational actors on the inclusion of children with special educational needs in Luxembourg. Sarah worked as a primary school teacher in Luxembourg for 5 years.

Last updated on: Friday, 06 July 2018

Academic Qualifications

  • 2011: MA in Educational sciences. Master thesis title: Inclusion in Luxembourg: which representations for which actors? An inventory-taking after the educational reform in 2009
  • 2009: BA in Educational science. Case title: The promotion of language awareness through interactive learning in primary school children

 

Professional career

  • Since 2017: PhD Candidate in the field of Multilingualism
  • 2011-2017: Primary school teacher in Luxembourg

Languages

Sarah Degano fluently speaks and writes English, French, German, Italian and Luxembourgish and understands notions of Spanish. She is currently learning Portuguese.



Last updated on: 06 Jul 2018

Sarah’s doctoral project follows a qualitative research paradigm with ethnographic research methods and takes place in three different primary schools in Luxembourg. It investigates to what extent 9-11-year-olds use their language repertoires to communicate and learn across different school subjects (German, French, Mathematics, Science and Arts). The focus lies on translanguaging. While studies in Luxembourgish preschool, Year 1 and Year 2 classes show that teachers have begun to draw on children’s semiotic repertoires, Sarah’s project targets Years 4 and 5.



Last updated on: 09 Jul 2018