Prof. Dr. Lindsay Flynn

Associate professor/Chief scientist 2

Department Department of Social Sciences
Postal Address Université du Luxembourg
Maison des Sciences Humaines
11, Porte des Sciences
L-4366 Esch-sur-Alzette
Campus Office MSH, E03 45-170
Email
Telephone (+352) 46 66 44 6291
Fax (+352) 46 66 44 36291

Lindsay Flynn is an Associate Professor of Political Science and Principal Investigator for the PROPEL project (2021-2025; FNR-ATTRACT grant 14345912). The PROPEL project (PRO-active Policymaking for Equal Lives) examines the links between governmental policy, housing markets, and inequality by examining the challenges current generations face in high-income OECD countries. The project is situated at the intersection of inequality studies and studies of the welfare state.

Lindsay's work is published in West European Politics, Politics & Society, and Social Politics, among others. Her article on childcare markets and maternal employment (Journal of European Social Policy, 2017) was one of 15 chosen out of over 2,500 articles as an official nominee for the Rosabeth Moss Kanter Award for Excellence in Work-Family Research.

Lindsay completed her undergraduate studies at Albion College (Michigan, USA) and graduate studies at the University of Virginia. A poster from her dissertation (examining work-family reconciliation policies) won the APSA Best Poster in Public Policy award in 2010. Before beginning at the University of Luxembourg, Lindsay taught political science and public policy at Wheaton College (Massachusetts). While there, she co-chaired the Curriculum Implementation Team, a committee charged with implementing a new undergraduate curriculum designed for the rigors and demands of a 21st century labor market.

Last updated on: Friday, 16 April 2021

Prof. Lindsay Flynn is currently recruiting three postdoctoral researchers and one PhD. 

Please download the jobs ad here.

 

Postdoctoral and PhD positions in Political Science and Related Social Science Fields:

Project on the Politics of Inequality & Housing

 

Interested in the ways in which housing policy and housing markets drive inequalities across key societal groups within and across countries? The PROPEL project (PROactive Policymaking for Equal Lives) is forming an interdisciplinary team with expertise in inequality, social policy, and political economy in order to identify the political inputs that shape housing markets and housing policies, trace the ways in which housing generates economic, social, and political inequalities in high-income OECD countries, and propose policy-relevant and evidence-informed solutions to address contemporary inequalities.

The PROPEL project is led by Dr. Lindsay Flynn and funded under an FNR €2 million ATTRACT Consolidator grant. The project is hosted at the University of Luxembourg within the Institute of Political Science and part of the interdisciplinary Department of Social Sciences. The team will benefit from formal collaborations with the Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research and the LIS Cross-National Data Center, with direct on-site access to LIS microdata. Positions are open to European and non-European nationals. Women, minorities, and members of any group typically underrepresented in higher education are encouraged to apply. Applications received by 15 May 2021 will receive full consideration. Interviews will be held remotely via videoconference.

  • Postdoctoral Researcher (36 months) focused on political inputs of housing policy: Training in qualitative and mixed-method techniques to research the political development of housing policy. This position is at the University of Luxembourg: Apply here.
  • Postdoctoral Researcher (36 months) focused on the unequal impact of housing policy: Training in survey design and quantitative analysis to assess the tradeoffs faced by younger and older generations. This position is at the University of Luxembourg: Apply here.
  • Postdoctoral Researcher (36 months) focused on testing causal mechanisms of housing policy: Training in experimental methods or evidence-based policy assessment to test causal links between housing policy and inequality. This position is at the Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research: Apply here.
  • PhD Candidate (36 months, extendable to 48 months) focused on linking housing policy to other policy areas: Admission into a fully-funded PhD program hosted in the Department of Social Sciences. Dissertation topic to be determined jointly on the topic of how housing markets, labor markets, and pension markets relate at the micro and macro level. This position is at the University of Luxembourg: Apply here.

 



Last updated on: 14 Apr 2021

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2020

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See detailEditorial
Flynn, Lindsay

in Intergenerational Justice Review (2020), 6(1), 3

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See detailThe Young and the Restless : Housing Access in the Critical Years
Flynn, Lindsay

in West European Politics (2020), 43(2), 321-343

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See detailHousing crisis: How can we improve the situation for young people?
Flynn, Lindsay

in Intergenerational Justice Review (2020), 6(1),

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2019

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See detailI’ll Just Stay Home: Employment Inequality among Parents
Flynn, Lindsay

in Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State, and Society (2019), 26(3), 394-418

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2017

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See detailChildcare Markets and Maternal Employment: A Typology
Flynn, Lindsay

in Journal of European Social Policy (2017), 27(3), 260-275

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See detailDelayed and Depressed: From Expensive Housing to Smaller Families
Flynn, Lindsay

in International Journal of Housing Policy (2017), 17(3), 374-395

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See detailCan Unequal Distributions of Wealth Influence Vote Choice? A Comparative Study of Germany, Sweden and the United States
Flynn, Lindsay; Paradowski, Piotr

in Jesuit, David K.; Williams, Russell Alan (Eds.) Public Policy, Governance and Polarization: Making Governance Work (2017)

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See detailNo Exit: Social Reproduction in an Era of Rising Inequality
Flynn, Lindsay; Schwartz, Herman Mark

in Politics and Society (2017), 45(4), 471-503

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