Home // University // News // Slideshow // 10 giant brains to celebrate 10 years of biomedical research

10 giant brains to celebrate 10 years of biomedical research

twitter linkedin facebook google+ email this page
Published on Friday, 13 September 2019

The exhibition “Mind the Brain” marks the 10th anniversary of the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg.

To celebrate this important milestone for biomedical research in the country, visitors can discover and purchase ten original works of art, and take that opportunity to dive into the secrets of the human brain.

10 brains – 10 artists – 10 years

Combining art with science, “Mind the Brain” exhibits 10 giant sculptures in the shape of a brain throughout the city centre of Luxembourg, from 15 September to 6 October. Each of the giant brains has been painted by a renowned Luxembourgish artist and represents one of the research areas of the LCSB. The exhibition offers a gateway to biomedical science for the public, with accessible information on research conducted at the LCSB.

“To celebrate our anniversary, we wanted to share our passion for science with many people, and to do it in an unexpected way,” explains Prof. Rudi Balling, director of the LCSB. “This is what inspired this exhibition and the artists really brought our vision to life. We are really happy to be able to collaborate with these creative minds.”

Ten local artists are participating in this exhibition: Monique Becker, Raphael Gindt, Thomas Iser, Frank Jons, Daniel Mac Lloyd, Eric Mangen, Marc Pierrard, Joel Rollinger, STICK and Alain Welter. Their work can be found in Luxembourg city, from Glacis to Cité Judiciaire.

An interdisciplinary research centre accelerating biomedicine

“The exhibition conveys so well what the LCSB is all about,” points out Prof. Balling. “Interdisciplinarity and innovation, challenges and exciting results!” For 10 years, the LCSB has brought together “brains” from all over the world to solve burning questions about brain diseases. Some of our talents have studied biology or medicine, others mathematics, computer science or physics. Combining people with different backgrounds and expertise into one interdisciplinary team creates more than the sums of its part and helps us find creative solutions to complex problems.

He concludes: “With nearly 250 people working together in 15 research groups and participating in over 400 collaborative projects, Luxembourg’s biomedical research is now on the map. Our expertise is internationally recognised in several key areas and we are forging ahead with new exciting scientific endeavours.”

Fundraising for art and science

To support both Luxembourgish art and biomedical research, the 10 sculptures are on sale. Half of the funds collected will go to the artists and the other half will support a research project in the field of neurodegenerative diseases. This project, focusing on early changes in Parkinson’s disease, aims to discover biomarkers and to facilitate diagnosis at the pre-symptomatic stage. A sales brochure is available on request. A social media campaign in partnership with Hogan Lovells Luxembourg will also help raise funds: for each photo of a brain sculpture posted with the hashtag #MindtheBrain, the law firm will give 1€ to biomedical research!

Let us take you on a journey through the brain and how we do research to solve its diseases!

More information on the website mindthebrain.lu and in the flyer of the exposition.